Summer School Step by Step

  1. The first thing you need is to choose a topic. It should be a place you will add to the Teenagers’ Guide to Everywhere.
  2. Next, find three sources of information for your topic
  3. Create a works cited page listing all three of your sources.
    1. Use EasyBib.com to organize your source's information. When you've created a list, then copy and paste it to your wikipage to save it.
  4. Use the username and password given to you in class to sign in to the wiki and then to go the page created for you.
  5. Having read through your sources, write down three to five main questions you think your sources will answer.
  6. On your document, type one of the questions. Then go through your sources and find information that answers that question.
  7. Write, in your own words, the information that answers the particular question.
  8. Whenever you add information from a source, you need to include a citation.
    • Each time you use information from a source, put a parenthetical citation after it. Even if you don’t quote, put the citation.
      • Note how to punctuate the citation: end the sentence, then put the parentheses, then put the period (Gaffney).
    • In the parentheses, put the first part of the works cited entry for that source. Usually that is the author’s last name or the beginning of the article’s title.
    • When you cite one source a few sentences in a row, put a citation when you finish that source or at the end of the paragraph.
    • If you quote a source, put a citation at the end of that sentence no matter what.
  9. Repeat the process for the other three to five questions.
  10. Write an introductory paragraph grabbing the readers’ attention and making them want to read more about your place. Use one of the attention grabbing techniques we’ve discussed in class (see handout).
  11. Save the page. If you finished early and want to consider adding pictures, do so. Use the link at the left for help. If you need to find your page later, use the search bar and use the name of your place.
  12. Write a short blurb for the map’s marker that will tempt people to go to your page. Type this at the bottom of your page, under the Works cited.


School year step by step

  1. The first thing you need is to choose a topic. It should be a place you will add to the Teenagers’ Guide to Everywhere.
  2. Next, find a source of information for your topic using a regular search engine (like Google, Bing, or Yahoo)
  3. When you find that website, do a CRACR evaluation of that site. Print your evaluation (one sentence for each characteristic)
  4. Find a second source using the State Library (http://library.sd.gov) (or try the public library and click on "Gale")
    1. Hover over Online Resources, click on “Online Resources A-Z”
    2. scroll down to use either Infotrac, ProQuest, or World Book Advanced
    3. Print out a copy of this source. You do NOT need to do a CRACR analysis.
  5. Find a third source from a location of your choice. If you choose a regular web site, do another CRACR evaluation for it. If you choose another state library source, just print it.
  6. Create a works cited page listing all three of your sources.
    1. For your State Library sources, you can find the citation written for you already. With the infotrac, it’s at the bottom of the document you printed.
    2. For your general web site, you’ll have to build your work cited entry using the handout I gave you. The handout is called “Works Cited Explanation.” Look under “General Website” for the guide.
    3. Format your page properly. Again, see the “Works Cited explanation” handout, this time look on the backside.
  7. Take notes on each of your three sources. Please format this properly, according to the handout I gave you. This handout has an example on it about penguins and a series of boxes in the left margin that tells you how to do your notes.
  8. Lay out your notes from your three sources in front of you and assign each of your sources a letter or a number. Write this letter/number on your notes.
  9. Read through your notes one time.
    1. After you read through them, write down the three to five main questions you think your notes answer.
    2. On a new document, type one of the questions. Then go through your notes and copy and paste each note that has to do with that question under it in a list. Be sure to write the number/letter for that source by each copied note.
    3. Type the next question and repeat the previous step for that question. Do so for all your notes.
    4. Print and hand in your outline.
  10. With your outline in front of you and your notes handy, write your questions down on a new document. Skip a line after the question and begin to write an answer to that question. Attempt to use your own words to summarize what your sources said. If you can’t put things in your own voice, then put quotes around the sources’ words.
    • Each time you use information from a source, put a parenthetical citation after it. Even if you don’t quote, put the citation.
      • Note how to punctuate the citation: end the sentence, then put the parentheses, then put the period (Gaffney).
    • In the parentheses, put the first part of the works cited entry for that source. Usually that is the author’s last name or the beginning of the article’s title.
    • When you cite one source a few sentences in a row, put a citation when you finish that source or at the end of the paragraph.
    • If you quote a source, put a citation at the end of that sentence no matter what.
  11. Write an introductory paragraph grabbing the readers’ attention and making them want to read more about your place. Use one of the attention grabbing techniques we’ve discussed in class (see handout).
  12. When your document is perfect, sign into your account with Wikispaces (see the top right corner above this page). Use your login from school and the password I gave you.
  13. Click on the plus sign by the Pages and Files and title a new page with the name of your place (or topic).
  14. Save the page. If you finished early and want to consider adding pictures, do so. Use the link at the left for help. If you need to find your page later, use the search bar and use the name of your place.
  15. Write a short blurb for the map’s marker that will tempt people to go to your page. Type this at the bottom of your page, under the Works cited.